Names Project Blog

OCLC Identities Hub

Posted in meetings by Amanda Hill on 26 August, 2008
WorldCat Identities home page

WorldCat Identities home page

OCLC are planning to prototype a “Co-operative Identities Hub” which aims to bring information from a wide range of name sources together and make them available more widely. The Hub will build on the work already undertaken by OCLC in the WorldCat Identities service, which takes the names of people and organisations from the Library of Congress/NACO authority file and those found in WorldCat and displays contextual information such as titles of works, associated subjects, publication timelines and book covers. The service also holds links to library authority files and to Wikipedia.

An advisory group has been established and the first conference call for this group took place last Friday. There’ll be a meeting later in the year to flesh out the details of the way that the prototype might move forward, but the approach sounds very promising and there was certainly a lot of interest from the advisory group, many of whom are facing names issues within their institutions.

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ISKO 2008 update

Posted in conferences by Amanda Hill on 8 August, 2008
Tower at Université de Montréal

Tower at Université de Montréal

The conference has been interesting. The papers have been a real mixture of the highly theoretical and abstract and those which are more pragmatic and based on solving problems. The session which included the presentation on the Names project was a case in point – the speaker before me was explaining how she had been analysing different thesauri that covered issues relating to water, to see whether they’d be useful for her organisation (the Mexican Institute of Water Technology), while the one who came afterwards was explaining how theories in the social sciences (Marxism, liberalism and feminism, for example) might be classified.

Jenn Riley of Indiana University talked about the disconnect between theoreticians and practitioners in her excellent presentation about the Variations3 Digital Music Library project. She lamented the fact that information professionals often neglect to think about the conceptual models that their content standards (e.g. MARC and MODS) are representing. Names is using the conceptual model of FRAD as the basis of the data structure for the prototype, thanks to the work that the British Library team have undertaken in the Data Analysis Report, so I was pleased to hear Jenn’s views on this.

The questions at the end of my talk included one from a librarian who took exception to the Names project’s aim of not having a preferred form of name for individuals. I had thought that this would be more acceptable now than it had been in the past – it’s a distinction between authority control and access control that has been fairly widely discussed in the library literature, but apparently it is still controversial. Interesting!

Saint Joseph's Oratory

Saint Joseph's Oratory

The keynote was given by Jonathan Furner of UCLA. Jonathan talked about the philosophy of identity and the process of identifying individuals and objects. He noted that all knowledge organisation systems reflect the world-view of the designers of the system (this is unavoidable), and stated that all such systems should aim to be ‘just’ (i.e. not violate the rights of any particular group). He also felt that such systems need to be responsive and dynamic in order to adapt to the needs of users of the system. This cannot be achieved with rigid hierarchical and centrally-controlled systems alone, although these do have their place. More social approaches such as user-tagging can help to reflect other world-views. This seemed to me to fit in well with the way we are planning that the Names prototype will work. We’ll be creating records for individuals, but also encouraging them to take ownership of the information within them.

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